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Connector SL [message #170670] Tue, 06 June 2017 08:55 Go to next message
Dmitriy Vladimirovich
Messages: 1
Registered: June 2017
Junior Member
Hello everybody. How to make a similar plug on the board circled in red in Eagle cad? And how to make such a board size circled in blue. Thank you.
[IMG_20170606fg_114437.jpg]
[IMG_20170606_114411.jpg]

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Re: Connector SL [message #170672 is a reply to message #170670] Tue, 06 June 2017 10:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rachaelp
Messages: 604
Registered: March 2015
Location: UK
Senior Member
Hi Dmitriy,

The card edge fingers can be created in a library part just like any other part, except you'll have to create them as SMT pads of the right size and spacing on both sides of the board and remember to turn off the generation of the tCream and bCream for these as you don't want solder paste on them. Create a symbol and map each of these fingers of the package to a pin on the symbol to make a complete device and that should work fine. I think there is an existing card edge connector library, but I would just create it myself if this was my project anyway.

For the board shape, delete the default rectangular board outline from the Dimension layer and then draw a new shape that matches accurately the outline of your board. Now when you add your connector to the schematics you should be able to place the connector in the board so its lined up exactly where it needs to be on the card shape. You'll probably want to add some notes to say the card edge needs to be bevelled and that the connector fingers need to be gold plated.

Best Regards,

Rachael

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Re: Connector SL [message #170673 is a reply to message #170670] Tue, 06 June 2017 11:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
geralds
Messages: 236
Registered: February 2014
Senior Member
Hi,
first as Rachael mentioned.
Then you'll find in your lbr the library files for edge connectors:
con-pc.lbr
con-sullinelectronics.lbr - for 0.50inch (1.27mm) edge connectors
as some examples.

You can copy from that and then you can make with that your own pcb outline.

Best Regards,
Gerald
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Re: Connector SL [message #170674 is a reply to message #170670] Tue, 06 June 2017 11:36 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Morten Leikvoll
Messages: 1351
Registered: November 2007
Senior Member
On 06.06.2017 10:55, Dmitriy Vladimirovich wrote:
> Hello everybody. How to make a similar plug on the board circled in red in Eagle cad? And how to make such a board size circled in blue. Thank you.
> [IMG_20170606fg_114437.jpg]
> [IMG_20170606_114411.jpg]
>

There are some issues you also need to take care of, and Eagle is not
helping much. They need to be specified to the manufacturer next to the
gerbers.

1-Make sure the PCB thickness is matching your socket (Yea, I've managed
to mess up this once!). If it's 1.6mm, you have a great chance of
accidentially getting it right.

2-The card edge needs beveling (v'shape) to be gentle to the receptor.
See datasheet of the receptor for recommendations.

3-The contacts need special coating to prevent oxidation. Normally this
is done in production by shorting all the pins before final cutout,
applying a voltage to them all while the edge of the pcb is dipped into
some chemical for coating deposit, then the shorts are cut out and
beveling applied. You can often see the thin tracks that used to short
circuit all the pins as leftover on the wider pads.


Also see http://www.eurocircuits.com/blog/gold-plating-for-edge-connectors/
Re: Connector SL [message #170675 is a reply to message #170674] Tue, 06 June 2017 12:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rachaelp
Messages: 604
Registered: March 2015
Location: UK
Senior Member
Hi Morten,
> There are some issues you also need to take care of, and Eagle is not
> helping much. They need to be specified to the manufacturer next to the
> gerbers.
>
You are right, special care needs to be taken to ensure that the board manufacturer sees and acts upon the additional information. Is there a standard way other tools do this that you know of? I've only ever seen notes added to drawings which are printed and supplied as part of the gerber set... But I have seen those completely ignored previously so you have to work especially hard to ensure that your board house really has paid attention to any additional information supplied.
> 1-Make sure the PCB thickness is matching your socket (Yea, I've managed
> to mess up this once!). If it's 1.6mm, you have a great chance of
> accidentially getting it right.
That's a very good point, I guess lots of people learn that lesson the hard way.... In fact I will be designing a board with a card edge soon so I will make a note of that now so I don't forget and have a stupid fail on the first prototype! :D
> 2-The card edge needs beveling (v'shape) to be gentle to the receptor.
> See datasheet of the receptor for recommendations.
>
> 3-The contacts need special coating to prevent oxidation. Normally this
> is done in production by shorting all the pins before final cutout,
> applying a voltage to them all while the edge of the pcb is dipped into
> some chemical for coating deposit, then the shorts are cut out and
> beveling applied. You can often see the thin tracks that used to short
> circuit all the pins as leftover on the wider pads.
These are the two things I mentioned in my post, but I probably wasn't clear enough about the gold plating. So, the process you refer to is actually to produce a harder gold plating for the connector fingers rather than the softer plating you get when you have a typical gold finished board. It's not about a surface to protect from oxidation, its so it's mechanically strong enough surface that it can withstand insertion into the edge connector socket without damaging the surface. I didn't actually know how it was done and that extra shorting traces were required which were then removed as part of the bevelling. Very useful info, thanks :)
> Also see http://www.eurocircuits.com/blog/gold-plating-for-edge-connectors/ ( https://www.element14.com/community/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww .eurocircuits.com%2Fblog%2Fgold-plating-for-edge-connectors%2F)
Ahhh, Eurocircuits, my go to board house for prototype boards. I've bookmarked that link for my upcoming project. Thanks :)

Best Regards,

Rachael

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Re: Connector SL [message #170676 is a reply to message #170675] Tue, 06 June 2017 13:12 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Chuck Huber
Messages: 601
Registered: October 2004
Senior Member
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
<div class="moz-cite-prefix">Dmitriy,<br>
<br>
Card edge connectors have been discussed several times in this
forum.  Rachael, Gerald, and Morten all provide very good advice. 
Board thickness, plating, and corner bevels are all important.<br>
<br>
Morten mentioned using a special coating for the contacts.  This
coating is usually gold (Au), for two reasons.  The first and
foremost reason was mentioned by Morten - it prevents oxidation. 
The second reason is to prevent galvanic corrosion.  Galvanic
corrosion occurs when two dissimilar metals are in contact in the
presence of an electrolyte.  In our case, the electrolyte is water
vapor and oxygen in the air.  The contact and subsequent corrosion
will cause unwanted voltage offsets and intermittent connection.<br>
<br>
In school, did you ever insert a copper strip and a zinc strip
into a potato or a lemon and measure the voltage it produced, or
used it to power an LCD clock?  When the experiment was complete
the electrodes had corroded.  This experiment exploits galvanic
corrosion to harvest energy.  Obviously the goal, in your case, is
not to exploit these effects, but to to avoid them.<br>
<br>
The connector used to attach to the card edge will most likely
have gold contacts.  Therefore, it is imperative that the contacts
on the card edge also have gold plating.  Since gold is a
relatively soft metal (considerably softer than copper), the
connector and card edge both have a limited number of insertions
before the gold is worn away in critical spots.<br>
<br>
Nickel or tin plating may also be available.  The cost is about
the same as gold plating (it's the process that drives the cost -
not the material).  But whatever you choose, make sure the same
material is plated onto the circuit board.<br>
<br>
Look for my post on 21-Jan-2014 titled "Re: Help for footprint
(edge
mounted connector)". I posted card-edge.lbr.zip which contains a
50-pin
edge connector setup in three different packages - one for the
left end
of the edge, one for the right end of the edge, and one for
somewhere in
between.
I believe a link to the thread is
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="http://www.element14.com/community/message/101512">http://www.element14.com/community/message/101512</a>.<br>
<br>
From that post:<br>
<blockquote>Carsten,<br>
 <br>
The attached isn't exactly what you want, but it should serve as
a guide<br>
on how to design an edge connector.  It's a 50-pin card edge
connector<br>
with three different configurations - left end of board edge,
right end<br>
of board edge, and middle of board edge.  As Richard mentioned,
you will<br>
have to work with your board house to specify the gold plating.<br>
 <br>
Note that zero-width wires are placed in the Dimension layer to
specify<br>
the cutout.  What's NOT in the design is a polygon or rectangle
that<br>
specifies the top and bottom finish.  Eagle has tFinish and
bFinish<br>
layers to specify exactly this.  You can add sections to your
CAM job to<br>
produce gerber files for these two layers, then name the output
files<br>
AuTop.gbr and AuBot.gbr.  That and a note in the README file
should make<br>
it pretty obvious to the board house which pads should be gold
plated.<br>
</blockquote>
I have attached to this post a zipped copy of the library.<br>
<br>
HTH,<br>
    - Chuck<br>
<br>
<br>
On 06/06/2017 08:01 AM, rachaelp wrote:<br>
</div>
<blockquote type="cite"
cite="mid:1256037040.11496750545186.JavaMail.jive@e14-cr-vp-appj8-03.premierfarnell.net">
<pre wrap="">Hi Morten,
</pre>
<blockquote type="cite">
<pre wrap="">There are some issues you also need to take care of, and Eagle is not
helping much. They need to be specified to the manufacturer next to the
gerbers.

</pre>
</blockquote>
<pre wrap="">You are right, special care needs to be taken to ensure that the board manufacturer sees and acts upon the additional information. Is there a standard way other tools do this that you know of? I've only ever seen notes added to drawings which are printed and supplied as part of the gerber set... But I have seen those completely ignored previously so you have to work especially hard to ensure that your board house really has paid attention to any additional information supplied.
</pre>
<blockquote type="cite">
<pre wrap="">1-Make sure the PCB thickness is matching your socket (Yea, I've managed
to mess up this once!). If it's 1.6mm, you have a great chance of
accidentially getting it right.
</pre>
</blockquote>
<pre wrap="">That's a very good point, I guess lots of people learn that lesson the hard way.... In fact I will be designing a board with a card edge soon so I will make a note of that now so I don't forget and have a stupid fail on the first prototype! :D
</pre>
<blockquote type="cite">
<pre wrap="">2-The card edge needs beveling (v'shape) to be gentle to the receptor.
See datasheet of the receptor for recommendations.

3-The contacts need special coating to prevent oxidation. Normally this
is done in production by shorting all the pins before final cutout,
applying a voltage to them all while the edge of the pcb is dipped into
some chemical for coating deposit, then the shorts are cut out and
beveling applied. You can often see the thin tracks that used to short
circuit all the pins as leftover on the wider pads.
</pre>
</blockquote>
<pre wrap="">These are the two things I mentioned in my post, but I probably wasn't clear enough about the gold plating. So, the process you refer to is actually to produce a harder gold plating for the connector fingers rather than the softer plating you get when you have a typical gold finished board. It's not about a surface to protect from oxidation, its so it's mechanically strong enough surface that it can withstand insertion into the edge connector socket without damaging the surface. I didn't actually know how it was done and that extra shorting traces were required which were then removed as part of the bevelling. Very useful info, thanks :)
</pre>
<blockquote type="cite">
<pre wrap="">Also see <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.eurocircuits.com/blog/gold-plating-for-edge-connectors/">http://www.eurocircuits.com/blog/gold-plating-for-edge-connectors/</a> (<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href=" https://www.element14.com/community/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww .eurocircuits.com%2Fblog%2Fgold-plating-for-edge-connectors%2F"> https://www.element14.com/community/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww .eurocircuits.com%2Fblog%2Fgold-plating-for-edge-connectors%2F</a>)
</pre>
</blockquote>
<pre wrap="">Ahhh, Eurocircuits, my go to board house for prototype boards. I've bookmarked that link for my upcoming project. Thanks :)

Best Regards,

Rachael

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To view any images and attachments in this post, visit:
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</pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
Re: Connector SL [message #170678 is a reply to message #170675] Tue, 06 June 2017 14:22 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Morten Leikvoll
Messages: 1351
Registered: November 2007
Senior Member
On 06.06.2017 14:01, rachaelp wrote:
[good stuff, as usual. Thanks for filling in :) ]

I could also mention that some edge connector standards defines
different lengths on edge pads, so that some pads makes contact early
(usually GND, nice for static potential equalization) or late (usually
some kind of card detect, for hotswapping use). But the old pcb images
shown doesn't seem to care, not necessarily because it wasnt necessary,
but rather because they didnt know about its advantages, or had the tech
to plate them back then.

Check the funny pin #2 from the left of https://i.stack.imgur.com/TK6jG.png

Also, have a look at your SD-card or similar to check different lengths.

Found this cool link:
http://www.connectortips.com/can-edge-card-connectors-be-exciting/
Re: Connector SL [message #170681 is a reply to message #170676] Tue, 06 June 2017 23:11 Go to previous message
Martin Riddle
Messages: 4
Registered: January 2017
Junior Member
On Tue, 6 Jun 2017 09:12:35 -0400, Chuck Huber
<chuck.huber@dukepro.com> wrote:

> Dmitriy,
>
> Card edge connectors have been discussed several times in this forum.
> Rachael, Gerald, and Morten all provide very good advice. Board
> thickness, plating, and corner bevels are all important.
>
> Morten mentioned using a special coating for the contacts. This coating
> is usually gold (Au), for two reasons. The first and foremost reason
> was mentioned by Morten - it prevents oxidation. The second reason is
> to prevent galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion occurs when two
> dissimilar metals are in contact in the presence of an electrolyte. In
> our case, the electrolyte is water vapor and oxygen in the air. The
> contact and subsequent corrosion will cause unwanted voltage offsets and
> intermittent connection.
>
> In school, did you ever insert a copper strip and a zinc strip into a
> potato or a lemon and measure the voltage it produced, or used it to
> power an LCD clock? When the experiment was complete the electrodes had
> corroded. This experiment exploits galvanic corrosion to harvest
> energy. Obviously the goal, in your case, is not to exploit these
> effects, but to to avoid them.
>
> The connector used to attach to the card edge will most likely have gold
> contacts. Therefore, it is imperative that the contacts on the card
> edge also have gold plating. Since gold is a relatively soft metal
> (considerably softer than copper), the connector and card edge both have
> a limited number of insertions before the gold is worn away in critical
> spots.
>
> Nickel or tin plating may also be available. The cost is about the same
> as gold plating (it's the process that drives the cost - not the
> material). But whatever you choose, make sure the same material is
> plated onto the circuit board.
>
> Look for my post on 21-Jan-2014 titled "Re: Help for footprint (edge
> mounted connector)". I posted card-edge.lbr.zip which contains a 50-pin
> edge connector setup in three different packages - one for the left end
> of the edge, one for the right end of the edge, and one for somewhere in
> between. I believe a link to the thread is
> http://www.element14.com/community/message/101512.
>
> From that post:
>
> Carsten,
>
> The attached isn't exactly what you want, but it should serve as a guide
> on how to design an edge connector. It's a 50-pin card edge connector
> with three different configurations - left end of board edge, right end
> of board edge, and middle of board edge. As Richard mentioned, you will
> have to work with your board house to specify the gold plating.
>
> Note that zero-width wires are placed in the Dimension layer to specify
> the cutout. What's NOT in the design is a polygon or rectangle that
> specifies the top and bottom finish. Eagle has tFinish and bFinish
> layers to specify exactly this. You can add sections to your CAM job to
> produce gerber files for these two layers, then name the output files
> AuTop.gbr and AuBot.gbr. That and a note in the README file should make
> it pretty obvious to the board house which pads should be gold plated.
>
> I have attached to this post a zipped copy of the library.
>
> HTH,
> - Chuck
>
>
> On 06/06/2017 08:01 AM, rachaelp wrote:
>> Hi Morten,
>>> There are some issues you also need to take care of, and Eagle is not
>>> helping much. They need to be specified to the manufacturer next to the
>>> gerbers.
>>>
>> You are right, special care needs to be taken to ensure that the board manufacturer sees and acts upon the additional information. Is there a standard way other tools do this that you know of? I've only ever seen notes added to drawings which are printed and supplied as part of the gerber set... But I have seen those completely ignored previously so you have to work especially hard to ensure that your board house really has paid attention to any additional information supplied.
>>> 1-Make sure the PCB thickness is matching your socket (Yea, I've managed
>>> to mess up this once!). If it's 1.6mm, you have a great chance of
>>> accidentially getting it right.
>> That's a very good point, I guess lots of people learn that lesson the hard way.... In fact I will be designing a board with a card edge soon so I will make a note of that now so I don't forget and have a stupid fail on the first prototype! :D
>>> 2-The card edge needs beveling (v'shape) to be gentle to the receptor.
>>> See datasheet of the receptor for recommendations.
>>>
>>> 3-The contacts need special coating to prevent oxidation. Normally this
>>> is done in production by shorting all the pins before final cutout,
>>> applying a voltage to them all while the edge of the pcb is dipped into
>>> some chemical for coating deposit, then the shorts are cut out and
>>> beveling applied. You can often see the thin tracks that used to short
>>> circuit all the pins as leftover on the wider pads.
>> These are the two things I mentioned in my post, but I probably wasn't clear enough about the gold plating. So, the process you refer to is actually to produce a harder gold plating for the connector fingers rather than the softer plating you get when you have a typical gold finished board. It's not about a surface to protect from oxidation, its so it's mechanically strong enough surface that it can withstand insertion into the edge connector socket without damaging the surface. I didn't actually know how it was done and that extra shorting traces were required which were then removed as part of the bevelling. Very useful info, thanks :)
>>> Also see http://www.eurocircuits.com/blog/gold-plating-for-edge-connectors/ ( https://www.element14.com/community/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww .eurocircuits.com%2Fblog%2Fgold-plating-for-edge-connectors%2F)
>> Ahhh, Eurocircuits, my go to board house for prototype boards. I've bookmarked that link for my upcoming project. Thanks :)
>>
>> Best Regards,
>>
>> Rachael
>>
>> --
>> To view any images and attachments in this post, visit:
>> https://www.element14.com/community/message/223633
>
>


If you look at the PCI specification, or even the Connector
specification. Details of the mating card are outlined and can just be
copied into your eagle design as FAB notes. The FAB hosue will know
what to do, as others have mentioned the choice of a hard gold finish
on the contacts is important.

My first PCI board came out just fine using notes from the PCI spec.
The board house can add the connecting wires for the plating so it's
not necessary to show them.

Cheers
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